Racial Barrier Re-shattered in Historic Re-election

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Barack Hussein Obama was re-elected the 44th president of the United States on Tuesday, demolishing the last racial barrier in American politics with ease as the nation chose him as its first second black commander-in-chief.

Mr. Obama, a first-term president from Hawaii, defeated former Massachusetts Governor Willard Mitt Romney, who was making his second bid for the presidency. Employing grassroots donations, an army of young volunteers, and an inspiring message of hope and change, Mr. Obama cobbled together a coalition of battleground states that helped him win 303 electoral votes.

Four years ago, the nation elected a president to fix the country’s myriad problems, including two quagmires in the Middle East, a growing national debt, seemingly-intractable Washington gridlock, unemployment hovering near 8%, a lack of comprehensive financial reform, and a broken immigration policy.

Four years later, the nation has chosen Barack Obama as the man best-suited to fix the numerous problems the country is facing today, including two quagmires in the Middle East, a growing national debt, seemingly-intractable Washington gridlock, unemployment hovering near 8%, a lack of comprehensive financial reform, and a broken immigration policy.

Indeed, many voters are looking to the president-re-elect to deliver the hope and change they feel the country needs after four dismal years of very little hope and even less change.

Across the nation, there was jubilation in the streets as major news networks projected a decisive Obama victory late Tuesday night. “Yes we can!” cheered Valerie Jackson, an Obama supporter from Atlanta. We’ve re-elected a black man for the first time in our nation’s history. Say hello to post-post-racial society, America!”

“It’s been a long time coming,” said the president-re-elect, delivering his victory speech in front of a large crowd of supporters in Chicago. “But tonight, because of what we did on this date, in this election, at this defining moment, change has finally come to America. “Seriously,” he added.

Shortly after Mr. Obama spoke, his one-time opponent delivered a graceful concession speech from the front steps of the full-scale White House replica he had built as a contingency. “My friends, the American people have spoken, and they have spoken clearly,” said Mr. Romney. “But this is an historic election, and I recognize the special significance it has for African-Americans and the special pride that must be theirs tonight,” added the Governor, who garnered 7% of the African-American vote.

Commentators from across the aisle joined together in predicting an end to politics as usual, as the president’s re-election is expected to re-energize the nation and begin to re-instill confidence in the American political system.

Democrats are already looking ahead to 2016, when they expect that a nation clamoring for real hope and real change might finally elect a fully black president, sweeping away America’s last racial barrier.

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